God’s Design for Men & Women

The last 50 years have seen a steady assault on traditional understandings of the roles of men and women and everything linked to it. In the last decade it has gathered pace: in the last 5 years we have seen a legal redefinition of marriage and an attack on the idea that your gender identity is determined by your biological sex. What does the Bible really teach about these things? How should we respond to those who struggle in these areas? What is God’s Design for Men and Women? Is God’s design good or oppressive?

The following sermons were preached as a series towards the end of 2016. There is also a link at the bottom of the page to a sermon by Ed Shaw which was preached at Eden Baptist Church in Cambridge:

God's Good Gift Of Singleness (Revelation 19:6-10, Revelation 21:1-4, 1 Corinthians 7:32-40)

Tim Gill, October 30, 2016
Part of the God's Design for Men and Women series, preached at a Sunday Morning service

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Revelation 19:6-10

Then I heard what seemed to be the voice of a great multitude, like the roar of many waters and like the sound of mighty peals of thunder, crying out,

“Hallelujah!
For the Lord our God
the Almighty reigns.
Let us rejoice and exult
and give him the glory,
for the marriage of the Lamb has come,
and his Bride has made herself ready;
it was granted her to clothe herself
with fine linen, bright and pure”—

for the fine linen is the righteous deeds of the saints.

And the angel said to me, “Write this: Blessed are those who are invited to the marriage supper of the Lamb.” And he said to me, “These are the true words of God.” 10 Then I fell down at his feet to worship him, but he said to me, “You must not do that! I am a fellow servant with you and your brothers who hold to the testimony of Jesus. Worship God.” For the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy. (ESV)

Revelation 21:1-4

21:1 Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.” (ESV)

1 Corinthians 7:32-40

32 I want you to be free from anxieties. The unmarried man is anxious about the things of the Lord, how to please the Lord. 33 But the married man is anxious about worldly things, how to please his wife, 34 and his interests are divided. And the unmarried or betrothed woman is anxious about the things of the Lord, how to be holy in body and spirit. But the married woman is anxious about worldly things, how to please her husband. 35 I say this for your own benefit, not to lay any restraint upon you, but to promote good order and to secure your undivided devotion to the Lord.

36 If anyone thinks that he is not behaving properly toward his betrothed, if his passions are strong, and it has to be, let him do as he wishes: let them marry—it is no sin. 37 But whoever is firmly established in his heart, being under no necessity but having his desire under control, and has determined this in his heart, to keep her as his betrothed, he will do well. 38 So then he who marries his betrothed does well, and he who refrains from marriage will do even better.

39 A wife is bound to her husband as long as he lives. But if her husband dies, she is free to be married to whom she wishes, only in the Lord. 40 Yet in my judgment she is happier if she remains as she is. And I think that I too have the Spirit of God. (ESV)

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Ed Shaw’s sermon on ‘The Plausibility Problem':

The Plausibility Problem – The Church and Same Sex Attraction, by Ed Shaw